Charging Your Kids Rent?

A high school friend of mine still lives at home, she’s 28¬†years old. She works full-time, has a car and only had a small amount of debt from one year of college which she paid off in a few months.

It was no secret that when we graduated high school, if she, same with her brothers, chose not to pursue post secondary education they would have 6 months before they had to start paying rent to live at home.They were expected to work full-time and couldn’t just sit on the butts at home.¬†¬†I don’t think this is a totally unrealistic request of parents.

Forcing your child to start contributing to the family’s finances is a smart way to teach great money¬†management¬†skills while in the¬†safety¬†of the family home and much less risk than being on their own. Since she started paying rent she was now allowed to have a say in the running of the house. She wanted her own land line in the house (she didn’t have a cell phone at the time) so she sat down with her mom and went over the family budget with her new rent contribution and budgeted in adding a second line to the phone budget. Her mom was a sweet, organized lady who taught her daughter a lot about ‘life skills’ so why is her 28-year-old daughter still at home then?

Never increasing the menial rent and allowing her daughter to stay too close to the¬†security¬†of home has allowed my friend to get much too comfortable. ¬†In her moms eyes, as long as she was paying rent, what my friend did with her money was ‘up to her’ as she had already taught her the skills, it wasn’t moms responsibility to implement them. The end result is my friend being 28 and still living at home. She blows through her money on food, clothes and crap for her ‘bedroom’ that she doesn’t need. I can only imagine what I could accomplish if I lived at home for 10 years after high school only paying $150.00/month.

I have no problem, and actually think it could be a smart move to charge kids rent who are not in post secondary and live at home after high school. Never charging any¬†amount¬†that could interfere with potential goals (if they’re taking time off school to save for travel or save for education etc) but I think by charging rent it teaches responsibility as an adult. Having said this there has to be some¬†guidelines. My friend is still at home because she still pays the same $150.00/month in rent that she did when she was 18.

I understand that mom is now compliant with their living situation but at what point do you force her to gain a life of her own? Something I would have done a long time ago. Mom needs to jack the rent up to a more respectable amount if she’s going to continue to allow her to live there, then maybe my friend will realize she could have a place of her own where she can start a life (of her own!) for the same amount of money. Once she gets this realization in her head, maybe, just maybe, she will start saving for said abode. Who knows? All I know is that I may have a crap load of debt but I wouldn’t trade my life, home, family and¬†independence¬†for anything, especially living with my mom at 28 years old.

Who has, or plans to potentially, charge their children rent after high school? OR Who has paid their parents rent? Opinions please!

{Note: I am not saying all¬†situations¬†are the same. I realize some people stay home for many different reasons, I know people in these sorts of situations. There is no ‘situation’ around said story, my friend is just a financial lazy ass with Momma encouraging it}

Children and Post Secondary: Why We Might Not Pay For All Of It

Knowing the financial mess one can end up in from not having a savings plan for post secondary education first hand, hubby and I opened a RESP for our daughter when she was 5 weeks old. I remember the representative going through the projected education costs for when she’s ready to graduate and was blown away. How can universities justify such an insane inflation?

This week a local news story came out about the rising costs of tuition in Canada. Tuition has increased 5% this year alone. Holy Cow.

At this rate, when baby girl is ready for post secondary, in 18 or so years (should she chose¬†university/undergraduate degree), we’re looking at over $12,000/year. That’s assuming she lives at home and hasn’t factored in books or any other added expenses.

Hubby and I have every intention of continuing regular monthly contributions, plus additional savings when she receives money as gifts and such, but we have no intention of stretching ourselves thin financially for her educational savings. When the time comes and have have more money for saving (vs debt payoff) investing as much money as possible into our own retirement savings is more important than throwing additional money into her RESP.

In a perfect world she gets a part time job when she turns 16 and learns the importance of saving for things that she wants, education included, but despite the¬†finical¬†mess I’m in, I have no problems with student loans and (student) lines of credit. Very rarely in life does the opportunity to borrow at such low interest rates come up, and with proper money¬†management¬†and budgeting skills could be a smart move. I¬†truly believe¬†that if there is some financial responsibility in your education it encourages you to work harder. For this reason if our savings isn’t enough to cover her I’m not going to worry about it. By the time she goes off for school she’s¬†guaranteed¬†to have learned good money¬†management¬†skills-a promise I make for her-and can properly manage a little credit in her name.

I have friends who insist on having enough savings for any and all education their child may pursue, even if they chose something like medicine or dentistry.

Just an FYI this year’s tuition costs for these programs:

Dentistry students paid the highest average undergraduate fees at $16,910. Medical students paid an average of $11,891 and pharmacy students paid $10,297.

Read it on Global News: Global Maritimes | Undergrad tuition up five per cent this year, more than triple inflation

At the 5% inflation we’re looking at almost $41,000/year for dentistry in 18 years…Just sayin’.

Maybe I’m a mean mom, or totally alone on this, but if we’re fortunate enough that our child can get through Medical or Dental school, I’m pretty sure they won’t have much problem paying off the degree, that’s for sure.

For those with children, who are saving for their post secondary education? Who is prepared to pay for 100% of it, regardless of academic pursuits?